Skip to main content

Math

intelino/Voyager: 7-9 Math/Physical Science Slope Lab

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Mon, 08/26/2019 - 16:30

Introduction

Math students are typically introduced to the concept of slope in the 7th grade, learning that slope has to do with steepness.  By the 8th grade many learn how to calculate the slope of a line as the rise divided by the run or rise over run.  If the rise is positive, then the slope is positive (sloping upward).  On the other hand, if the rise is negative, then the slope is negative (sloping downward). If the line is horizontal, then the slope is zero.

Grade Level

What is Ocean Acidification? (HS-Secondary)

Profile picture for user Danny
Submitted by Danny on Mon, 08/26/2019 - 00:12

Climate change is at the forefront of environmental concerns and it often revolves around atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and its effect on average surface temperature. However, carbon dioxide concentration is not only rising in the atmosphere but in the ocean as well. The source of this dissolved carbon dioxide is the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels we hear so much about, as carbon dioxide is soluble in water.

Grade Level

Pi from Voyager and an Intelino Smart Train

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Wed, 08/21/2019 - 18:16

Introduction to Pi

There is probably no number that has received more interest since ancient times that the number pi, symbolized by the Greek letter π.  Originally defined as the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, it has been given approximate values including 3.14 and 22/7.  Proven to be an irrational number, supercomputers have computed the value of pi to more than one trillion digits.

Subject

intelino/PocketLab: A Study of Randomness for Grades 6-8

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Tue, 08/06/2019 - 20:44

Introduction

This lab, featuring Voyager and intelino, designed for junior high math students, will help your students understand the true nature of randomness.  By the time youngsters enter junior high school, they have encountered randomness in a variety of situations.  They have likely seen random ping-pong balls drawn in lotteries.  They have seen coin tosses before the start of football games.  They may have been asked to draw a random card in a card trick.  Perhaps they or their parents have purchased tickets for a raffle.  The list could g

Subject
Grade Level

How much Carbon Dioxide do you Produce? (MS-ESS3-4 )

Profile picture for user Danny
Submitted by Danny on Fri, 07/05/2019 - 00:59

It is almost instinctive when you first get the PocketLab Air to breathe directly on it just to see what happens. As seen below, of the PocketLab Air's seven sensors, five of them detect changes from a direct human breath. These parameters are carbon dioxide, particulate matter, temperature, humidity, and pressure. The most interesting of these is the sharp rise in carbon dioxide which, as the most important greenhouse gas, brings about strong connections to the topic of climate change.

Brownian Motion: Order from Chaos

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Fri, 03/15/2019 - 02:27

Brownian Motion

Brownian motion can be defined as the random motion of particles in a liquid or gas caused by the bombardment from molecules in the containing medium.  Have you ever looked at dust particles in the sunlight shining through a window?  They appear to move about randomly, even defying gravity.  This is an example of Brownian motion in which the dust particles are bombarded on all sides by gas molecules in the air.  Other examples of Brownian motion include the motion of grains of pollen on the surface of still water, the dif

Grade Level

Moment of Inertia vs. Mass

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Sun, 02/17/2019 - 21:06

Introduction to Moment of Inertia

There are numerous analogies when comparing linear and rotational motion.  At the heart of these comparisons lie the concepts of mass on one hand and moment of inertia on the other.  In addition to being a property of any physical object, mass is a measure of the resistance of an object to acceleration when a net force has been applied to the object.  Newton's Second Law of Motion expresses this in the familiar equation F = ma.  By analogy, the moment of inertia of any rigid obj

Subject
Grade Level

Physical Pendulum: Finding Moment of Inertia

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Tue, 02/12/2019 - 18:22

Introduction to the Physical Pendulum

Mount any rigid body such that it can swing in a vertical plane about an axis passing through the body.  You have constructed what is known as a physical pendulum.  The video below shows an example of such a pendulum.  In this video, a rigid circular body is swinging about an axis very close to the edge of the circle.  The circle was cut from a piece of cardboard.  PocketLab Voyager is resting at the bottom of a ring stand directly below the pivot point of the pendulum.  A tiny magnet has been attached to the bottom of the ci

Subject
Grade Level

Hysteresis with Rubber Bands

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Wed, 02/06/2019 - 17:49

Introduction to Hysteresis

Hysteresis can be defined as a lag time in the response of a system to forces placed on the system.  The response of the system depends not only on the present magnitude of the force but also on the previous history of the system.  From the point of view of mathematics, the response to the force is a double-valued function.  This means that one value applies when the force is increasing, while another value applies when the force is decreasing.  A graphical plot of force and re

Subject
Grade Level